All posts filed under: Qi Food

Discover Mexico’s Gastronomic History

I’m trhiled to share with you my new projects: Pass the Chipotle Podcast and SABOR! This is Mexican Food Magazine. Mexico’s  national  cuisine  is  an  infinite  source  of  inspiration,  knowledge  and  pleasure. Indeed, I believe there’s no better way to explore a culture than through its gastronomic history. Through SABOR! and its sister project, the Pass the Chipotle podcast, I hope to share my findings – a new approach to Mexico’s food and culinary traditions – with you. Thank you for joining me on this journey! SABOR! This is Mexican Food is a quarterly digital magazine dedicated to the exploration of Mexico’s gastronomic heritage and traditions. Each issue of the magazine offers easy to follow recipes that are delicious and unique, accompanied with great photography and in-depth articles about Mexico’s gastronomic traditions, SABOR! This is Mexican Food celebrates Mexico’s amazing culinary heritage. Click bellow to purchase the magazine. Pass the Chipotle is a delicious and thought provoking bi-weekly podcast discovering Mexico’s gastronomic history. Presented by me, Rocio Carvajal Food researcher, cook and author. It will …

Dining with strangers: the joy of Supperclubs and my incursion as guest cook

Nude white walls frame the long dining room, their bare elegance and few minimalistic decorations give it a rather Scandinavian atmosphere. Music and home-made delicacies pour from the open kitchen, the black piano becomes another dish on its own and in that perfect canvas magic happens: hungry strangers in a stranger’s house have come together to break bread, enjoy life, discover and even make friends for life… if only for the night. Underground counterculture has always been the other side of the main stream coin. Supper clubs are a response to the formality and blurry uniformity of restaurants, their existence is based on the three basic needs: to eat, to socialize, to explore. Foodie startups are no doubt a deliciously sophisticated form or anarchism, supper clubs have been around since the last century, secret dining societies gather at private houses either by invitation or pre booking and enjoy home-made meals while strangers become friends. Miriam’s Kitchen Table is located in the green outskirts of Huddersfield in Brontë country, where she has been creating tasty memories for …

Transmutation of food. Thoughts on Crenn and Redzepi

I often find myself reflecting on what’s behind and beyond food as a cultural process of creation and consumption, beyond our place in the food chain. We constantly disrupt the natural states of raw, fresh, dry and rotten to transform food and ingredients to every limit imaginable. For the past days I’ve been doing some cross-reference reading between Dominique Crenn’s Metamorphosis of taste and UK WIRED’s article: Noma’s taste of Tomorrow, without any deliberate effort I saw many connections between the way both Redzepi’s and Crenn’s approach and relationship of food. For neither becoming a celebrity chef was a goal in their lives, like most true geniuses they simply navigated towards it [food] as a means to manifest their creativity. For Redzepi the transmutation of the environment and its elements isn’t limited for their edible qualities or their natural physical state (s) -but for both-cheefs creative freedom is a very structured and deliberate exercise of perpetual experimentation. The self-imposed restrictions -for the case of NOMA– to only work with regional ingredients forces the team to …

A 19th century British soldier’s diet

Many thanks to Dr. Aoife Bhreatnach for her guest post, this amazing piece gives us a very round idea of the politics, economics and little known facts about Army Food during the Crimean war. Follow Aoife on twitter @GarrisonTowns  and visit her very interesting website. And now, enjoy the post! Rough and unpalatable, often unwholesome: a 19th century British soldier’s diet. Recruiting sergeants, while plying potential soldiers with drink, waxed lyrical about the comforts of army life. Regular, daily meals and a bed to himself would have seemed luxurious to many men who joined the army, because most recruits were among the poorest in society. But the quality and quantity of food served to the British soldier during the nineteenth century was poor and inadequate. Even worse, the unlucky recruit soon discovered that he had to pay for that food out of his meagre daily wage of 1 shilling as part of a ‘stoppages’ system, whereby soldiers paid for their own clothing, boots, food and equipment. While the Treasury and War Office slowly, reluctantly improved …

Bath and the best of everything in England

In the 18th century Londoners rejoiced at the most popular spa of its time: Bath, this attraction even caused a soaring rise in the acquisition of country houses. Bath, without a doubt was the place to be and be seen. A constant pilgrimage –on medical grounds- took place since roman times when the famous baths were built over the many mineral hot springs. The renewed Pump room with its sumptuous regency makeover was at the centre of Bath’s social life, rich, young and eligible girls made it their playground. It seems as Dorothy Hartley says that “in Bath was the best of its kind, even Bath buns were superior to all buns!” One explanation to Bath’s many food delicacies and tea-time treats is the vast network of roads that used to connect the city to Bristol, Gloucester, Glastonbury, Devon, Somerset and of course London. A true foodie paradise for those who could afford it, the finest beef, sharpest of apples, cider, apricots, plums, salmon and pilchards. And from overseas fine French salt, scents and spices, …

Lessons from Mumbai: Dabbawala old school fast food

For anyone living in a western country, poor or developed we all have to at least spend some portion of our money and time in a lunch break. It is estimated that in Britain the sandwich industry contributes around £7.85bn to the domestic economy. However if you are disciplined enough to prepare your daily lunch box or -even better- have someone else to prepare it for you, you will be saving some good money at the end of the year, apart from the obvious benefits of ensuring a healthy meal. But let’s face it, however fancy your average lunchbox will hardly exceed two items, perhaps a sandwich or a salad and a snack or a fruit. Now what would you think if I told you there’s a place: Mumbai, where working people (often bureaucrats –and mostly men-) have a daily delivery, literally to their desks of at least 4 different courses plus nan, chapatis or other bread to accompany their meals. All hot, all freshly made. Usually by their wives but also by specialized businesses …

Sarsaparilla: The root of root beer

I can clearly remember when as a kid my grandad used to take me and my brother for a treat and long beautiful soda glasses came in with that dark syrupy and ice cold liquid, crowned with a floating ball of pearly vanilla ice cream. Slurp…cold. Slurp…sweet, sweet fizzy dream. Slurp and I stepped into a sugary oblivion. I never understood why it was called root beer, but I did wonder if real beer tasted like this, I knew why grownups were so obsessed with it. Of the many varieties of Smilax sarsaparilla is the most recognised. Native to Mexico and Central America, the sarsaparilla is a shrub that grows in semitropical climates and produces small round fruits that turn bright red or purple when ripe. In Colonial times, Spaniards shipped sarsaparilla to Europe, quite often making stops in Jamaica where the plant was introduced and quite well received. If only Mrs. Beeton had known!   In pre-Columbian times, fermented drinks were prepared by infusing corn based drinks with shavings of sarsaparilla root but it …