All posts filed under: History

Discover Mexico’s Gastronomic History

I’m trhiled to share with you my new projects: Pass the Chipotle Podcast and SABOR! This is Mexican Food Magazine. Mexico’s  national  cuisine  is  an  infinite  source  of  inspiration,  knowledge  and  pleasure. Indeed, I believe there’s no better way to explore a culture than through its gastronomic history. Through SABOR! and its sister project, the Pass the Chipotle podcast, I hope to share my findings – a new approach to Mexico’s food and culinary traditions – with you. Thank you for joining me on this journey! SABOR! This is Mexican Food is a quarterly digital magazine dedicated to the exploration of Mexico’s gastronomic heritage and traditions. Each issue of the magazine offers easy to follow recipes that are delicious and unique, accompanied with great photography and in-depth articles about Mexico’s gastronomic traditions, SABOR! This is Mexican Food celebrates Mexico’s amazing culinary heritage. Click bellow to purchase the magazine. Pass the Chipotle is a delicious and thought provoking bi-weekly podcast discovering Mexico’s gastronomic history. Presented by me, Rocio Carvajal Food researcher, cook and author. It will …

Food Rationing in WWII Britain

Very often we read that during wartime, specifically WWII and the following recovery period, nutrition of the overall population had not only good standards compared to our modern diets but it is actually considered that the generation that was brought up under such harsh conditions had indeed less nutritional deficiencies. Regardless of appearances or even taste, food safety was a top priority and with just enough to ensure well balanced daily meals, food rationing without a doubt saved millions of lives in the battlefields and the home front. In the case of Britain it took much more than a stiff upper lip to carry on with life in spite of the war, but it was a combination of factors such as social policy and direct action from the government to administrate scare resources and actively engage the whole of the population in taking actions to ensure their survival. In a previous post I talk about the Ministry of Food and the Victory Gardens that provided the population with a permanent and unlimited source of vegetables. …

Sandwich. A global History

Bee Wilson Reaktion Books Edible Series   This little book is part of the series that includes titles that explore the history of foods such as soup, cake, wine, cheese, pie, sauces, etc. you will be able to read it in one go with a nice cup of coffee.   The size of the book speaks for its depth, it doesn’t mean to be an encyclopaedic study but just an entertaining and well documented history of the humble sandwich. Some of the aspects that the author explores are how this food came to be and why did it root so deep and fast across social classes, cultures and proved its resilience through time and still stands strong as the default and most beloved on the go meal. Its convenience, reliability, endless possibilities of filling and portability are just some of its best features. A sandwich however also testifies the shifts and changes of our dietary habits, routines and ways in which we have had to cope with the demands of our modern life. A sandwich says the author necessarily carries …

A fig tart to kill for (almost literally…in Ancient Rome at least)

The famous Roman statesman and writer Cato the Elder –author of De Agri Cultura in which he described a bread called: Mustaceus, find more about it here– persuaded Rome to go to war “over some figs”. Seems like Cato feared that the Phoenician colony was becoming a threat to the Roman trade of African products and as proof of it he presented the senate with a bunch of large ripe figs claiming they had been brought from Carthage. Apparently this was enough to instigate the senate to take military action against the Phoenicians… and yet again Rome went to war in what became known as the Tertium Bellum Punicum or Third Punic war (149–146 BC). The word punicum means phoenecian in Latin. Figs (Ficus sycomorus) have been present in religious, medicinal and gastronomic texts and oral traditions for millennia. They were first domesticated in south west Asia and the Mediterranean area and there are more than 800 cultivars and species that go from vines to shrubs, trees and bushes. Figs have long being regarded as …