All posts filed under: Guest Post

Eating yourself clean.

For my regular readers and new ones too you might find that I’ve explored the many sides of food as research topic, from cultural practices, gastronomic traditions, philosophy, literature, religion and a topic I’ve been thinking about is food as medicine or as a tool to heal. I invited Alex Vickers to share her own life story and how she decided she wanted to help people live better. which I find very interesting to say the least, I hope this piece provides you with a whole new angle to see food and how we can better relate to it.  Alex Vickers is a Naturopathic Nutritional Therapist (Dip.Nut.CNM) She has a great interest in food and the good (or harm) that it can do. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge with others and helping them to the best health.   The path to wellbeing begins with: ‘First do no harm’. First of all, what is a naturopath health practitioner? I hear you ask, well is a professional who applies natural therapies to heal, balance and help …

A 19th century British soldier’s diet

Many thanks to Dr. Aoife Bhreatnach for her guest post, this amazing piece gives us a very round idea of the politics, economics and little known facts about Army Food during the Crimean war. Follow Aoife on twitter @GarrisonTowns  and visit her very interesting website. And now, enjoy the post! Rough and unpalatable, often unwholesome: a 19th century British soldier’s diet. Recruiting sergeants, while plying potential soldiers with drink, waxed lyrical about the comforts of army life. Regular, daily meals and a bed to himself would have seemed luxurious to many men who joined the army, because most recruits were among the poorest in society. But the quality and quantity of food served to the British soldier during the nineteenth century was poor and inadequate. Even worse, the unlucky recruit soon discovered that he had to pay for that food out of his meagre daily wage of 1 shilling as part of a ‘stoppages’ system, whereby soldiers paid for their own clothing, boots, food and equipment. While the Treasury and War Office slowly, reluctantly improved …