All posts filed under: Awesome Recipes

Fingerlicking sticky sweet-sour pork bowls

Everyday life has its own struggles and challenges, we all know that. Often we find ourselves drained and in need of a tight hug with a reassuringly whisper saying everything is going to be fine. For those that for whichever reason are away and struck with homesickness trying coping with it all: I’m with you, believe, I know exactly how you feel. So here is a nice recipe that serves as a self, warm, containing hug. The fragrant sweetness of the pineapple and the sticky sauce warranties to send your worries away. This is a skinny version, the original recipe features on The Hairy Bikers‘ Asian Adventure, you can read the review of that great book here. To make enough for 3 -4 servings, plenty for leftovers you will need: 700g spare ribs chopped (or diced pork chops) 2 eggs 1 tbsp corn flour Vegetable oil for frying or coconut oil. 3 tbsp tomato ketchup 1 ½ cup chopped pineapple (try to use fresh) Salt 1/5 cup orange juice Chlili flakes Serving suggestion: Steamed rice Method: …

Uova da raviolo, the mother of all ravioli

In a previous post I’ve written about the anecdotical assumptions on the history of tortellini and Lucrezia Borgia’s navel. This time I’ll show you how to make an epic and rich raviolo. Uova da raviolo is a a single raviolo with a ricotta and spinach nest and a raw egg yolk that when boiled and lightly fried in butter cooks gently but remains tender and gooey, adding a luscious creamy texture that balances the freshness of the cheesy next and earthiness of the brown butter sauce. There is nothing complicated about this recipe, if anything it takes practice to achieve a thin, even pasta sheet and be careful when boiling it, otherwise is a straight forward, comforting dish at its best. Quick note on the name, in Italian the nouns ending in o in their singular form, change to i in plural. Raviolo = singular > Ravioli = plural. Just like gnocco > gnocchi; spaghetto > spaghetti, etc.) On with the recipe. To make 6 ravioli to feed 3… or 2, you will need:  100g strong wheat flour 2 …

The Kaiser of all rolls and the Austrian bakers’ victory

Just like the rest of central Europe, in Austria there’s a long tradition of home baking that has been influenced by Bohemian, Swiss, Italian, Czech and of course German bread and pastries. But a shared passion for dainty rolled buns dates way back to the lavish 18th century empires. The fine Austrian baking and patisserie productions have been a source of pride for rofessional bakers but things weren’t always easy for them. The Kaiser in question. Once upon a time in the 19th century, the baker’s guild of Austria faced severe obstacles when the prices of bread were fixed by the state, after much negotiation and soft power politics, the guild manged to convince the Kaiser Franz Joseph I to abolish fix prices and let the free market self-regulate, after granting the petition, the gild named the popular semmeln or bread rolls after him and the Kaiser rolls rose to fame. Franz Joseph Emperor of Austria and was also responsible for taking the Habsburg Monarchy to a whole new level of power and after the …

Ploughman’s Sandwich: The best of Britain in every bite

From humble ingredients come the best soul feeding, tummy filling feasts. It is often the case that hard working peasants and farmers who have made it possible for civilizations to thrive live hard lives, working from dawn to dusk their dedication and efforts have indeed contributed to shape our diets. But what do they eat?  what has their culinary heritage been, and how has their food made it to become cultural gastronomic staples? Britain’s evangelistic passion for sandwiches tells the story of its own culinary evolution and to illustrate this let’s explore the history of the ploughman’s sandwich. First things first, a ploughman is just another name for farmer, especially those who plough the earth to prepare the fields to be planted. It’s easy to imagine they have: little time to eat, need to refuel good and can’t spare the time to do complicated lunch prep. A ploughman’s lunch is a simple picnic consisting largely of: bread, cheese, cucumber, tomato, lettuce and a sharp and either sweet or savoury of pickled vegetables, this humble meal …

The emperor’s favourite: Pasanda Curry

Pasanda is thick, creamy, aromatic and velvety looking and by far one of favourite curries ever. The history of this dish dates back to the 16th century and became a staple at the courts of Moghul Emperors of turco-mongol origin that ruled India under a Muslim Persianate dynasty. In Urdu, thw word pasande means “favourite” and was prepared with the fines cuts of meat, but nowadays it is equally prepared with lamb, chicken or sea food. It is considered a mild curry because of the use of coconut milk, ground almonds and shredded coconut that give it a thick granular texture yet creamy and rich. Now, I have seen several versions of this dish, some with more or less coconut milk and some with more or less tomato puree. I prefer my Pasanda milkier and creamier yet spicy, also it gives it a great look from the more common red, green or orange-golden curries. This makes a great dish for a special occasion a dinner party or birthday lunch. To prepare this luscious curry -chicken …

Deliciously juicy and healthy köttbullar: Swedish meatballs

How many times have you walked in the Swedish mothership in search of bits and bobs to make your home a better place and finished exhausted and rabidly hungry just to queue for dry and tasteless meatballs… exactly. But Despair no more, I have a speedy twist for juicy, flavourful and speedy meatballs for any weeknight dinner, guaranteed to satisfy you. To feed two, you will need: 1 medium onion finely chopped 1 eggs 1 tsp allspice 1 tsp cayenne pepper 1 ½ tsp salt ½ tsp pepper 1 ½ cup minced beef 2 tbsp olive oil Brown sauce: ¼ cup coconut milk 4 tbsp chopped parsley ½ tsp cinnamon 1 cup boiling water 2 tbsp gravy granules 3 1/4 cups beef broth salt & pepper Dill garnish: 1 cup of fat free Greek yoghurt 4 tbsp chopped dill Salt and pepper Method: Begin with the dill garnish, simply mix all the ingredients and pop in the fridge to allow it to chill, don’t take it out unit before serving.  Next. Choose a big bowl …

Weeknight Roast and the Chickens that came from China

A few days ago an article on the Smithsonian Magazine got me thinking about the domestication of chickens and how often we take this docile birds for granted when we really ought to place them on a high pedestal since they’ve fueled an alimentary empire. Although chicken was widely eaten in ancient Greece, there’s evidence that shows traces of its domestication in China circa 5400 BC -but- other sources claim it happened around 8000 BC, be as it may chicken turns out to be the very first domesticated bird ever. We can find references to both hens and cocks in many religious rituals -in may of them like the Jewish Kaparot the poor birds don’t live to tell it. Here in Britain a domestic ritual celebrating togetherness and meat as an everlasting symbol of triumph over life’s vicissitudesis is: the Roast. Cooked in one of the most ancient ways by roasting and garnishing with simple vegetables. Roasts are typically made with lamb, beef or chicken. We know I’m neither British nor I eat meat but …